The Transfiguration

$ 11.00

Saturday 7:45 - 9:20pm in Auditorium 4
Sunday 5:10 - 6:47pm in Auditorium 5

When a film can wear its cinematic influences on its sleeve but still manage to tell an original tale, it’s a beautiful thing. Equal parts a love story, a gritty and highly progressive indie drama and a chilling riff on a vampire story, The Transfiguration centers around troubled teen Milo, who has a fascination with vampire lore, and the equally alienated Sophie. The two form a bond that begins to blur Milo's fantasy into reality.

After graduating from film school, first-time director Michael O’Shea worked a succession of odd jobs while harboring hopes of making a film. He eventually put himself on the clock—if in a decade he hadn’t made progress toward his dream, he would move on to something else.

The horror genre fascinated O’Shea, so he began work on a script he would eventually turn into The Transfiguration, and with the help of his girlfriend/producer Susan Leber, got the small-budget film made. He missed deadlines to enter it at Sundance and SXSW, so he submitted to Cannes, not expecting it to be selected. When it was, the arrival of a compelling new talent had been proclaimed.

 

The Transfiguration

$ 11.00

Saturday 7:45 - 9:20pm in Auditorium 4
Sunday 5:10 - 6:47pm in Auditorium 5

When a film can wear its cinematic influences on its sleeve but still manage to tell an original tale, it’s a beautiful thing. Equal parts a love story, a gritty and highly progressive indie drama and a chilling riff on a vampire story, The Transfiguration centers around troubled teen Milo, who has a fascination with vampire lore, and the equally alienated Sophie. The two form a bond that begins to blur Milo's fantasy into reality.

After graduating from film school, first-time director Michael O’Shea worked a succession of odd jobs while harboring hopes of making a film. He eventually put himself on the clock—if in a decade he hadn’t made progress toward his dream, he would move on to something else.

The horror genre fascinated O’Shea, so he began work on a script he would eventually turn into The Transfiguration, and with the help of his girlfriend/producer Susan Leber, got the small-budget film made. He missed deadlines to enter it at Sundance and SXSW, so he submitted to Cannes, not expecting it to be selected. When it was, the arrival of a compelling new talent had been proclaimed.